Ozmo

Glitched Gods of Olympus

Italian Institute of Culture, New York

January 17, 2024 - February 12, 2024

My art is often a bridge between the past and the future, where tradition meets innovation, and not only because of the type of images I retrieve and remix.
I have always used digital tools to create a dialogue between classical images and contemporary expressions. Photoshop, for me, has been a laboratory of experimentation, where I have created digital collages that blend historical and modern elements, creating new visions.
Using Google Images turned out to be my personal contemporary Library of Alexandria, giving me unlimited access to a global archive of images. This has allowed me to explore and reinterpret ancient and modern iconographies, creating a visual fabric that spans epochs and styles, and also to retrieve for instance all the images I used for the ‘Transatlantic’ installation.
In the emerging field of generative artificial intelligence, AI can be used to reinterpret large amounts of visual data, creating works that challenge our perception of reality. Spontaneously and with great enthusiasm, I therefore integrated AI technology into my artistic research.
The choice of using a networked and uncensored AI (unlike all the more powerful and paid-for ones), which accepts representations of nudes and ‘sensitive words’ has added a new layer of exploration: AI generates images that are tainted by bias and conventions, distorting and reinventing classical forms that are thousands of years old.
The result is a work that explores the boundary between the real and the imaginary, the sacred and the profane, the classical and the surreal. AI-generated art is mixed with my digital creations, offering a unique insight into the expressive potential of the union of art and advanced technology.
Titles such as ‘Asian Apollo’ ‘Black Hercules’ or ‘Hercules with Eastern Girlfriend,’Stoned Dionysus’ or ‘Portrait of Dumb Apollo’, were used in the AI generation string as disruptive experiments to probe where artificial intelligence gets trapped in clichés and biases by forcing the dominant canons of Western Greek classical art. These works represent a visual dialogue between pastels, with their tradition and texture, and digital images, with their immediate modernity.
The series is an ongoing experiment, a quest that moves between eras, prejudices and clichés, revealing how the past can be reinterpreted through the lens of contemporary technology, transforming it into a research tool for the present.

Ozmo